Wednesday, November 30, 2005

Gulls

I've been busy with the camera this week. I wonder where I put the
battery recharger when I came back from holiday?

Today on my way to work I wanted to get some pictures of the red
leaves down by the river, but most of them had blown away. I took a
picture of the river, instead. There are enough leaves left for it
still to look lovely.

(Click to enlarge)



From the bridge I saw that the turtles hadn't returned. I didn't
think they would, really, but I always hope. They don't usually come
back until spring. Where do they go in winter?

Instead, there were seagulls. I haven't seen seagulls at the river
before, although I have seen ducks. One of the gulls was standing on
the turtles' rock. "This is MY rock now," it said.



There were a lot of gulls. Hanging over the bridge I saw one was
fishing. It would float for a while on the river, then rise up in the
air and plunge into the water, catching a small fish. I took a lot of
pictures, and a couple of them turned out pretty well.





I got one other of an airborne gull, and then I had to go.



When I came back after work the gulls were gone.

5 comments:

kenju said...

Good pics. I like the one of the gull on the rock, with the leaves floating around it.

melinama said...

Don't they bury themselves in the mud and dream till things warm up?

naridu said...

The one with half his body in the water caught my fancy, especially the way his wings seem ready to pump him up into the sky again.

Cheryl said...

You are a great photographer to catch the action with such timing and clarity - very impressive.

When I lived in West London the gulls would precede the really bad weather, coming inland to escape the coast.

Now I live at the coast, the come back in Spring, but are partial to baby duckling as well as fish, so we make loud noises and scare them off if they take a break at the village pond.

That just makes your photo of the diving gull even more unusual and impressive, to me.

Pearl said...

Great action shots. The exposure and sharpness above and below water must be hard.